Forensic information sources during the investigation of war crimes

Keywords: War crimes, criminal proceedings, investigations, effectiveness of evidence, forensic information.

Abstract

The relevance of studying the forensic information sources in the investigation of war crimes is determined by the specifics of these acts, the impact of the armed conflict on the activities of law enforcement officers, and the need for information exchange between national and international agencies. The aim of the study is to determine the specifics of working with forensic information sources in the investigation of war crimes. The research employed the logical method, comparative method, forecasting.

The commission of war crimes in wartime determines the specifics of the choice of forensic information sources. The legal status of information affects the possibility of its use in the investigation process. Working with data sources depends on regulatory, infrastructural support, and staffing. Subjects of work with forensic information sources are national and foreign law enforcement agencies and international institutions. The appropriateness of data exchange using European platforms is substantiated.

The academic novelty of the research consists of analysing the sources of forensic information in the context of the specifics of war crimes and the specifics of cooperation between national and international agencies.

The study reveals the prospects of algorithmization of work with sources of forensic information on war crimes in the context of armed conflict.

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Author Biographies

Andriy Shulha, Donetsk State University of Internal Affairs, Kropyvnytskyi, Ukraine.

Candidate of Juridical Sciences, Associate Professor of the State and Legal Disciplines and Public Administration Department, Faculty №4, Donetsk State University of Internal Affairs, Kropyvnytskyi, Ukraine.

Andrii Tkach, National Academy of Internal Affairs, Kyiv, Ukraine.

Candidate of Juridical Sciences, Senior Lecturer of the Department of Criminal Procedure, National Academy of Internal Affairs, Kyiv, Ukraine.

Yevheniia Murzo, National Academy of Internal Affairs, Kyiv, Ukraine.

Postgraduate student, Department of Criminal Procedure, National Academy of Internal Affairs, Kyiv, Ukraine.

Maryna Horodetska, Donetsk State University of Internal Affairs, Kryvyi Rih, Ukraine.

Doctor of Law Sciences, Associate Professor, Head of the Department of Organization of Pre-trial Investigation, Faculty №1, Kryvyi Rih Educational & Scientific Institute, Donetsk State University of Internal Affairs, Kryvyi Rih, Ukraine.

Tetiana Sokur, National University “Zaporizhzhia Polytechnic”, Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine.

Doctor of Philosophy, Associate Professor of the Department of Criminal, Civil and International Law, Law Faculty, National University “Zaporizhzhia Polytechnic”, Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine.

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Published
2023-11-30
How to Cite
Shulha, A., Tkach, A., Murzo, Y., Horodetska, M., & Sokur, T. (2023). Forensic information sources during the investigation of war crimes. Amazonia Investiga, 12(71), 103-116. https://doi.org/10.34069/AI/2023.71.11.9
Section
Articles
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