The Concept of “New Life” as a Powerful Psycholinguistic Element in the Inaugural Addresses of the U.S. Presidents

Keywords: political language, inaugural address, concept of “new life”, sema “new”, semantic group “novelty”.

Abstract

The article deals with the concept of “new life” in the inaugural addresses of the U.S. presidents. A political language, as a reflection of people’s behavior in a certain ethnocultural community, is under the consideration. The investigation of political language caused the special approach to the analysis of lexical units that comprise the semantic group “novelty”. Based on this analysis a group of words that have the common sema “new” was singled out. The means of expressions and stylistic devices that presidents used to express the idea of “new life” were determined. The presidents make people believe in their ability to take new actions and change the situation, lead the nation to new, better life. Adjective “new” is often used by the presidents in context of the necessity to revitalize old values, to renew the nation spiritually. Analysis of inaugural address of American presidents showed that ideas of “new life” run through the entire speech of every president. In this article the role of the idea of “new life” in inaugural addresses of American presidents and means of its conveying has been studied. Model of a “new life” can be rather complex, needs more or less strong argumentation. The very word-combination the “better life” predetermines that this life should be different from the existing one, i.e. new. Thus concept of “new life” plays important role in political discourse. Consequently, our research may be understood not only as belonging to a narrow sphere of analysis of political discourse but to wider branch of science – linguistic political science.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Maria Shutova, Kyiv National Linguistic University.

Doctor of Philology, Head of Department of English Language and Translation, Faculty of Oriental Studies of the Kyiv National Linguistic University.

Svitlana Mudrynych, Kyiv National Linguistic University.

Ph.D. (Linguistics), Associate professor, Department of English Language and Translation, Faculty of Oriental Studies of the Kyiv National Linguistic University.

References

Bartmiński, J. (2005) The linguistic worldview: Ethnolinguistics. Moscow: Indrik.

Bush, George W. (1990). State of the Union Addresses of George W. Bush. Project Gutenberg License. www.gutenberg.org/files/5049/5049-h/5049-h.htm

Caroll, J. B. (1956). "Introduction". Language, Thought, and Reality: Selected Writings of Benjamin Lee Whorf. Cambridge, Mass.: Technology Press of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. pp. 1–34. ISBN 978-0-262-73006-8.

Cruz, A. (2001). Language and Political Science. Panama: University of Panama.

Garabík, R. and Altmann, G. (2015). Testing the thematic concentration of text. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics, 22, 215-232.

Kendall, K. (1993). Public Speaking in the Presidential Primaries through Media Eyes. Campaign’ 92: New Frontiers in Political Communication. American Behavioral Scientist, 4. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0002764293037002011

Kobozeva, I. (2009). Component analysis of lexical meaning [Komponentnyiy analiz leksicheskogo znacheniya]. Moscow.

Köhler, R. (2017). Exact Methods in the Study of Language and Text. Berlin – New York: Mouton de Gruyter.

Kyle, A.R. (2017). Influence of the Presidential Inaugural Address on Audience Perceptions of Candidate Image and the State of the Nation. United States: Portland State University.

Lim, E.T. (2004). Five Trends in Presidential Rhetoric: An Analysis of Rhetoric from George Washington to Bill Clinton. Presidential Studies Quarterly.

Lippmann, W. (2004) Public Opinion. Project Gutenberg. United States.

Mati, D. (2012). Ideological discourse structures in political speeches. Komunikacija i kultura online, 3, 54-78.

Sapir, E. and Irvine, J. (2002). The psychology of culture: A course of lectures. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. ISBN 978-3-11-017282-9.

Savoy, J. (2010). Lexical Analysis of US Political Speeches. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics, 2, 123-141. https://doi.org/10.1080/09296171003643205.

Simonson, P. (2020). The Short Story of Rhetorical Theory. Philosophy and Rhetoric, Vol. 3, 1, 75 – 88. https://doi.org/10.5325/philrhet.53.1.0075 https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/philrhet.53.1.0075

The Encyclopedia Americana (1985). Danbury, Conn.: Grolier..

Vorobiova, O. (2000). Political vocabulary. Its functions in modern oral and written speech. Arkhangelsk: Pomor M. Lomonosov State University.
Published
2020-10-16
How to Cite
Shutova, M., & Mudrynych, S. (2020). The Concept of “New Life” as a Powerful Psycholinguistic Element in the Inaugural Addresses of the U.S. Presidents. Amazonia Investiga, 9(33), 08-16. https://doi.org/10.34069/AI/2020.33.09.1
Section
Articles