The historical role of Islam in the public life of the Central Asian region of the CIS in the XX – XXI centuries

  • Vladimir M. Kozmenko Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia
  • Natalia V. Logacheva Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia
  • Saken Zh. Toktamysov Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia
  • Yulia E. Belanovaskaya Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia
Keywords: Central Asia, clergy, confessional politics, Diaspora, hard power, Islam, madrasa, maktabs, parallel Islam, regional elite, soft power, Sufism, Sunnism, Turkestan.

Abstract

The article is devoted to the historical and contemporary aspects of Islam in Central Asia. It shows the confessional policy of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union in Turkestan. The document proves that this policy was based on a combination of “hard” and “soft” management techniques and concludes that regional policies contributed to the transformation process in Central Asia. Furthermore, the article shows the role of Islam in regional modernization processes and the author identifies the key elements of the religious situation in the region, showing the main religious groups in the local Islamic communities. The paper notes the features of government policy in Central Asia in regard to Islam.

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Author Biographies

Vladimir M. Kozmenko, Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

[1] Doctor in Historical Sciences, Professor, Head of Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

Natalia V. Logacheva, Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

PhD in Historical Sciences, Docent of Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

Saken Zh. Toktamysov, Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

PhD in Historical Sciences, Docent of Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

Yulia E. Belanovaskaya, Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

PhD in Historical Sciences, Docent of Department of Russian History, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, Russia

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Published
2020-01-25
How to Cite
Kozmenko, V., Logacheva, N., Toktamysov, S., & Belanovaskaya, Y. (2020). The historical role of Islam in the public life of the Central Asian region of the CIS in the XX – XXI centuries. Amazonia Investiga, 9(25), 452-460. Retrieved from https://amazoniainvestiga.info/index.php/amazonia/article/view/1094
Section
Articles